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Clocks change: what about bedtime?

yawning baby sleep clocks change bedtime
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Clocks change: what about bedtime?

yawning baby sleep clocks change bedtime
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clocks change bedtime

With the impending clock changes, parents are asking how to cope with bedtime. So, we’ve written our top tips to help you navigate the change with minimal disruption. 

1. Stick to your rhythm 

In our sleep workshops we talk a lot about rhythm / ritual (not routine). This conditions your child to know when to start winding down for bedtime — so, their brains begin to predict sleep. 

Provided that this is already in place, it shouldn’t be too difficult to work with the clock changes. Without a time based routine, a rhythm is able to occur whenever – so the time almost becomes irrelevant. ​

2. Go with the flow

Take your cues from your child. When they begin to appear sleepy, start the bedtime rhythm with them. Their body will fairly quickly adjust to the new timings. ​

3. Keep it dark 

Biologically, we’re designed to sleep when it is dark. However, given that our clocks change for ‘daylight saving’, you’re pretty much guaranteed that in some seasons it will be light during bedtime. Similarly, sometimes it will be dark in the mornings.

A blackout blind can help to keep your child’s room dark. However, you could close the curtains around their room prior to bedtime in order to create a darker environment ​

4. Adjust bedtimes gradually 

If your child is struggling with the new ‘time’, try adjusting their bedtime by 15 minutes each day (either before or following the clock change – adjust according).

5. Fresh air

Remember that the key to a good night’s sleep is lots of exposure to light during the day (morning — lunch is optimum but anytime you can get outdoors in the fresh air is beneficial). ​

6. Be prepared for the clocks to change

It is likely that because your child is either up earlier in the morning or going to bed slightly later in the evening that they may be more tired and thus grumpier than normal the following day. 

Try to be understanding and remember that it will pass (very quickly if experience is anything to go by). If you are struggling with your baby or toddlers sleep and would like to understand the science of sleep whilst also adding tools to your toolkit, head over to our website to find out more.

Find out more

Our article, Simple sensory tools to improve baby sleep (and yours too)

To find out more about baby and toddler sleep visit the Baby sleep section of our Knowledge hub, or find a consultant for individual support.

Recommend0 recommendationsPublished in Babies, Baby sleep, Being a parent, Child sleep, Children, Parents & families, Toddler sleep, Toddlers
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